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A viral video of two boys hitting an injured deer that was shot resulted in an investigation by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

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In the video, which was filmed in Brookville, Pennsylvania, we can see the boys banging the bullet in their noses, tearing their antlers and stomping on their throats, all alive.

During the assault, we hear the boys laugh and wonder if the deer is still alive.

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On Sunday, the video was uploaded to Facebook by Braxton Sherry, where she was shared more than 8,000 times.

"I hate to share that, but you have to do something about it," Sherry wrote.

In response to the video, the Pennsylvania Game Commission said it was "investigating the issue."

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1/17 Sumatran elephant

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Endemic to the far east of Russia, Amur Leopard has a population of about 84 years and is in critical danger of extinction. Follows all species listed by WWF as critically endangered.

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3/17 Yangtze Finless Marspoise

Endemic to the Yangtze in China, the Yangtze Harbor Porpoise has an estimated population of 1000-1800 inhabitants.

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When it was discovered in the 1950s, the tiger population of southern China was estimated at 4,000 people. In 1996, she was more than 30 to 80 people. Scientists consider the tiger as "functionally extinct", as it has not been seen for more than 25 years

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6/17 Western lowland gorilla

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Getty

7/17 Sumatran Rhinoceros

The Sumatran rhinoceros is the smallest surviving rhinoceros species. Only 80 are known to live today. The last rhinoceros from Sumatra in Malaysia died on May 28, 2019

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8/17 Sumatran Tiger

There are less than 400 Sumatran tigers left today. They are seriously threatened by deforestation and poaching

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Half of the rainforest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where these gorillas live has been destroyed in the last 50 years. There were 17,000 eastern lowland gorillas in the 1990s but scientists estimate that their population has declined by more than 50% since then.

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The rarest marine animal in the world has only 30 inhabitants. They were discovered in 1958 and are endemic to the Gulf of California in Mexico.

Paula Olson / NOAA

11/17 Java rhinoceros

The most threatened species of rhinoceros, there are only 58 to 68 Java rhinos left.

Reuters

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The saola was first seen in 1992. It was the first large mammal to be discovered in over 50 years. Scientists have only seen saola in the wild four times and it is considered to be in danger of extinction.

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The tiger population of Malaysia has only 250 to 300 people.

Getty

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The hawksbill population has declined by more than 80% over the last century. They are threatened by black market poachers who kill them for their shells

Getty

15/17 black rhinoceros

The black rhinoceros population decreased by 98% between 1960 and 1995 due to poaching.

Getty

16/17 Cross River Gorilla

The Cross River gorilla population has been damaged by deforestation and poaching; it is now between 200 and 300

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17/17 Orangutan of Borneo

The population of the Orangutan of Borneo has been reduced by more than 50% over the past 60 years, reaching about 104,700 people. Their habitat has been reduced by at least 50% in the 21st century

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"The Pennsylvania Game Commission is aware of a video claiming to show individuals abusing a wounded deer," the agency wrote on social media. "The behavior described in the video is reprehensible and potentially constitutes a violation of the law."

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The agency also asked anyone with information about the incident to report it to the Operation Game Thief hotline at 1-888-PGC-8001 or to the Game Commission's North West Region dispatch office. at 814-432-3187.

Last week, President Trump signed a bipartite bill that makes animal cruelty a federal crime punishable by fines and up to seven years in prison. Laws in all 50 states already include provisions on the crime of cruelty to animals, but the new bill would help prosecutors deal with animal abuse cases between states, according to animal rights groups.

The bill, however, does not apply to people who kill animals for food, or those who hunt, trap and fish.

The Independent contacted the Pennsylvania Game Commission for comments.

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